School Programs and Field Trips

Sign up for the Region of Waterloo Museums School Programs e-Newsletter to receive information about our School Programs direct to your inbox.

View our Region of Waterloo Museums 2019 / 2020 School Programs Magazine.

A school field trip to the Ken Seiling Waterloo Region Museum and Doon Heritage Village is a one-of-a-kind interactive learning opportunity for your class that brings curriculum to life and creates lasting memories. We make it our goal to ensure that programs are linked to and in harmony with the Ontario Ministry of Education Curriculum and we offer excellent educational value and fun for your students. Region of Waterloo Museums have updated our existing programs and introduced some new offerings, including revised learning resources for teachers.  

 Ken Seiling Waterloo Region Museum School Programs
Once Upon a Time
Kindergarten/Grade 1 - Social Studies
Nursery rhymes are the focus of this fun program, where students see animals, feed the chickens, play games, and help with household chores.
Heritage and Citizenship - Relationships, Rules and Responsibilities
The Kindergarten Program, 2016 and Grade 1: Our Changing Roles and Responsibilities
1.5 hours, maximum 45 students

Everyday Structures
Grade 1 - Science and Technology
In this hands-on, participatory program, students use tools and models to simulate construction techniques as they examine barn frames, log buildings, and other structures.
Structures and Mechanisms – Everyday Structures
2 hours, maximum 60 students

Family and Community Traditions
Grade 2 – Social Studies
This program introduces students to a variety of events and festivals celebrated in the Region of Waterloo, including Eid, Hanukah, Diwali, and Chinese New Years. Combine with A Village Christmas 1914 to make a full day visit.
Heritage and Identity – Family and Community Traditions
2 hours, maximum 60 students (offered November and December)

A Village Christmas 1914
Grade 2 and 3 – Social Studies
Christmas and New Year are events used to demonstrate how traditions and celebrations are passed on, preserved, and changed. Students examine ethnic groups, as well as home and public celebrations. Combine with Family and Community Traditions to make a full day visit.
Grade 2 Heritage and Identity - Changing Family and Community Traditions
Grade 3 Heritage and Identity - Communities in Canada, 1780 to 1850
2 hours, maximum 90 students (offered November and December) 

Waterloo Wellington Children’s Groundwater Festival
Grade 2 to 5
The program covers a variety of Science and Technology, and Heritage and Citizenship units.
Full day, no student limit, free bussing when applicable
Runs on specific dates in May. 
For more information visit www.wwcgf.com 

Strong and Stable Structures
Grade 3 – Science and Technology/Social Studies
This program focuses on structures, building upon the material learned in Grade 1 with an emphasis on what makes a building stable. Students look at joints, struts, braces, ties, and more in a variety of structures on site.
Structures and Mechanisms - Strong and Stable Structures
Heritage and Identity - Communities in Canada: 1780 to 1850
2 hours, maximum 60 students

Communities in Canada 1780 to 1850 – half day
Grade 3 – Social Studies – Heritage and Identity
In our half-day version of this program, we take an integrated, interactive look at the three main communities in southwestern Ontario during this time period. We examine how First Nations, European settlers, and settlers of African descent lived and interacted.
Heritage and Identity - Communities in Canada, 1780 to 1850
2 hours, maximum 75 students

Communities in Canada 1780 to 1850 – full day
Grade 3 – Social Studies – Heritage and Identity
In our full-day version of this program, we compare how First Nations, European settlers, and settlers of African descent lived and interacted during this period. Students will compare the similarities and differences between these three main communities in southern Ontario as they visit the main museum gallery, historic village buildings, and take part in hands-on activities.
Heritage and Identity - Communities in Canada, 1780 to 1850
4 hours, maximum 120 students

Communities in Canada 1780 to 1850
Grade 3 – Social Studies
Enjoy a half-day or full-day version of this program, which examines the lives of First Nations, European settlers, and settlers of African descent in southern Ontario during this period. Students will compare the similarities and differences between these groups as they visit the main museum gallery, historic village buildings, and take part in hands-on activities.
Heritage and Identity - Communities in Canada, 1780 to 1850
Half day, maximum 60 students; full day, maximum 120 students

First Peoples Springtime Education Days
Grade 3 to 5 – Heritage and Identity
First Nations, Métis and Inuit Connections
In the days leading up to National Indigenous Peoples Day, students learn about the history and current realities of the Region's First Nations, Métis, and Inuit populations. A variety of activities, including dance, music, art, and traditional teachings by Elders, are presented in partnership with the Waterloo Region District and Waterloo Catholic District School Boards.
Program content relates to many studies in history and social studies across the curriculum.
Full day, maximum 140 students per day (June 17 to 19, 2020)

Amazing Machines
Grade 4 – Science and Technology
Students are challenged to use the seven simple machines and their problem solving skills to deal with real life issues. Devices such as block and tackles and winches are used by students in full scale.
Structures and Mechanisms - Pulleys and Gears
2 hours, maximum 60 students

First Peoples Autumn Education Days
Grade 5 to 8 – Heritage and Identity
First Nations, Métis and Inuit Connections
Students learn about the history and current realities of the Region's First Nations, Métis and Inuit populations. Educational programming, presented in partnership with the Waterloo Region District and Waterloo Catholic District School, includes dance, crafts, art, and traditional teachings by Elders.
Program content relates to many studies in history and social studies across the curriculum.
Full day, maximum 400 students per day (September 24 to 26, 2019)

Louis Riel Days
Grade 5 to 8 – Heritage and Identity
First Nations, Métis and Inuit Connections
This program focuses on key events surrounding the life and death of Louis Riel. All activities, including the raising of the Métis flag, workshops, Métis and Voyageur games, music, and others are presented in cooperation with the Grand River Métis Council.
Program content relates to many studies in history and social studies across the curriculum.
Full day, maximum 120 students (November 12 and 13, 2019)

Taking Flight 
Grade 6 – Science and Technology
Connect your classroom studies into flight and biodiversity with two new feature gallery exhibits, Birds of Prey and Going Places: Past Present Future. A combination of curriculum related activities in the museum galleries, mixed with time for independent exploration, makes for a meaningful, science-based learning opportunity.
Structures and Mechanisms, Life Systems
2 hours, maximum 60 students (September through December)

Forest Festival
Grade 6 and 7 – Science and Technology, Social Studies, Geography
Through hands-on interactive activities, students learn several key messages: the importance of the forest life zone, forest ecosystems, species at risk, stewardship and conservation, and climate change.
Program content relates to many studies in science and geography across the curriculum.
Full day program, maximum 500 students per day (October 9 and 10, 2019) 

Canada:  A Changing Society – (half day or full day)
Grade 8 to 10 - History
In this program, students learn about lifestyles, technology, and the factors of social change in 1914. Through a variety of activities, from health and medicine to leisure and entertainment, students gain firsthand insight into life over 100 years ago.
Grade 8: History - Canada: A Changing Society
Half day or full day, maximum 120 students

Berlin to Kitchener in the Great War
Grade 10 - History
Technology, soldiers, women's history, and a name change. What happened in Waterloo County and Berlin in the First World War? Combine this program with Canada: A Changing Society for a full day experience.
Canadian History Since World War I – Academic and Applied
2 hours, maximum 80 students

Great War Education Days
Grade 10 - History
This is an event-style program offered in partnership with the History Matters Association, a Great War re-enactor organization. Bringing a wide variety of collected First World War artifacts and paraphernalia, enthusiastic presenters display military fashions of the different nations; run battle school; explain equipment through demonstration; discuss the role of women in the war; address life on the home front; and run students through a coordinated battle re-enactment.
Full day, maximum 400 students per day (September 30 and October 1, 2019)

For more information or to book a Ken Seiling Waterloo Region Museum School Program contact: 

Michael Van Huisseling
Education Coordinator 
519-748-1914 ext. 3269
Email Michael Van Huisseling

 Schneider Haus National Historic Site School Programs
Kinderreim
Kindergarten - Math, Language, and Art
We sing songs, tell stories, and play old-fashioned games that the Schneider children would recognize. Math, language, and art are interwoven throughout the activities of this program, which takes place in our historic house and yard. During the fall and spring months, we incorporate outdoor activities in our gardens.
The Kindergarten Program
1.5 hours, maximum 60 students 

Feathered Friends
Kindergarten – Math, Language, Science and Technology
We keep kids hopping in this program! Students look at the stages of development inside the egg, do some birdie-style dancing and drama, predict and measure egg weights with a scale, and of course visit the baby chicks – all of which makes for a memorable visit.
The Kindergarten Program
1.5 hours, maximum 60 students
Offered March through May 

Schneider Family Rules
Grade 1 - Social Studies
Get into costume and step back in time into the role of a Schneider child from the 1850’s! Students will learn firsthand about the changing roles and responsibilities at home and in the community. Touring room to room and throughout the site, there is always work to be done: cooking in the kitchen, coffee to grind in the pantry, laundry to wash, and settling the baby to sleep.
Heritage and Identity - Our Changing Roles and Responsibilities
2 hours (this program can be combined with others to make a whole day visit), maximum 60 students 

Plants, Animals, and People in the Environment
Grades 1 to 4 - Science and Technology
Roll up your sleeves, it’s time to get to work outside as we dig into the natural world relationships that our planet relies on. Explore plant parts and needs, such as pumping water and working in the garden; making medicine from plants; using mini-microscopes to examine healthy soils; tending to the vermiculture box, and more!
Understanding Life Systems, Understanding Matter and Energy, Understanding Earth and Space Systems
2 hours (this program can be combined with others to make a whole day visit), maximum 60 students
Offered in the Fall and Spring 

It’s Tradition!
Grade 2 - Social Studies
Food, clothing, music, celebration, and ceremony are all things we have in common, but practise differently. With a Mennonite ‘lens’, this interactive program explores common elements that thread through most cultures. Students will participate in a Working Bee. In the fall we focus on apple related activities (making cider and dried apple pieces called Schnitz) and in the spring we shift to wool processing.
Heritage and Identity - Changing Family and Community Traditions
2 hours (this program can be combined with others to make a whole day visit), maximum 60 students 

Patterns and Puzzles
Grades 1, 2 and 3 – Math, Art, Social Studies
This program shows children why quilts are more than something to just throw on their beds! Symmetry, shapes, design, and storytelling are all rolled up into this hands-on, puzzle-solving program. Students work together to lay out different quilt patterns, learn why Waterloo Region has a rich history of stitching together, and get a sneak peek at a selection of this year’s Mennonite Central Committee auction quilts.
Patterning, Geometry and Spatial Sense, Measurement
Exploring Forms and Cultural Contexts
Heritage and Identity
2 hours (this program can be combined with others to make a whole day visit), maximum 60 students
Offered in May 

Our Canadian Wildlife
Grades 2 and 4 - Science and Technology
From white-tailed deer to red foxes, this program introduces students to the wildlife and animals found in our backyard! We explore our temporary exhibit, Canadian Wildlife Photography of the Year, with hands-on activities that encourage students to examine the differences between local mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians, as well as the relationships between humans and animals in both past and present day contexts.
Understanding Life Systems – Growth and Changes in Animals, Habitats and Communities
2 hours (this program can be combined with others to make a whole day visit)maximum 60 students
Offered October 11, 2019 to April 26, 2020 

Canadian Communities
Grade 3 – Social Studies
Students learn about and experience what early settlement was like for the many immigrants who would come to call Canada home. Through hands-on activities and with a focus on the Mennonite population that still makes this region unique, students are divided into activity groups to take part in one of three activities: rope-making, sewing, and cooking.
Heritage and Identity - Communities in Canada 1780-1850
2 hours (this program can be combined with others to make a whole day visit), maximum 60 students

Bread Making: Settlement and Science
Grade 5 - Science & Technology and Social Studies
Through the activity of bread making, we ‘stir up’ discussion about settlement and science! This program provides students with a hands-on opportunity to experience an important activity, not only for early settlers but for peoples from around the world today. Physical and chemical changes, changes of state, and the affects of heat (fire) on matter are demonstrated as students produce three types of bread for sampling: Pennsylvania German Rye, Irish Soda, and Indian Chapatti.
Understanding Matter and Energy – Properties and Changes in Matter
Heritage and Identity - First Nations and Europeans in New France and Early Canada
2 hours, maximum 60 students 

Communities Past and Present 
Grade 6 – Social Studies
Students will discover community groups that call Waterloo Region home, with a focus on the local Mennonite community. We compare, contrast, and contextualize local communities of the past to those that comprise present-day Kitchener. Activities include an exploration of foodways, medicine, language, arts and culture.
Heritage and Identity – Communities in Canada, Past and Present
2 hours, maximum 60 students 

Building Berlin, 1800-1850
Grade 7 and 8 – History and Science & Technology
The early nineteenth century was a time of great change in Canada. Focusing on this transitional period, students will discover the necessities and skills required by this area’s early setters to survive their first winter, begin building functional homes, and form the Village of Berlin (Kitchener). Students will learn about heritage structures and construction techniques, working hands-on with timber-framing and shingle-making tools.
Canada, 1800 – 1850: Conflict and Challenges
Understanding Structures and Mechanisms – Form and Function
2 hours, maximum 60 students

German Language and Heritage
Grade 9 to 12 – Language and History
Pennsylvania-German and continental German traditions meet at Schneider Haus, as we discuss how these groups interacted in Berlin (Kitchener). Students touring the historic house are given the opportunity to stop and take part in a number of activities, such as cooking, woodworking and singing, to experience both similarities and differences within German cultural traditions.
2 hours, maximum 40 students

The Schneider’s as Newcomers
High School and Adult ESL - Language
Practice conversational English in a nationally significant historic setting. Suitable for high school and adult ESL / ELL classes, this program provides an introduction to the customs and culture of the Schneider’s, a Pennsylvania-German Mennonite family representing one of the first European immigrant groups to arrive in Waterloo Region. Basic level language is used to discuss life in the nineteenth century.
1.5 hours, maximum 40 students

History Detectives – Outreach Program
Multiple grades - Social Studies
We bring intriguing artifacts and lively activities to you! In this inquiry-based learning opportunity, students examine and explore mysterious objects from the museum’s collection, gathering their own clues, questions, and observations to draw conclusions. Students are encouraged to consider the historic objects in terms of their own lives, experiences, and community.
1 hour, maximum 30 students

For more information or to book a Schneider Haus National Historic Site School Program contact: 

Katie Anderson
Education Coordinator 
519-575-4491 ext. 3247
Email Katie Anderson

 McDougall Cottage Historic Site School Programs
New outreach school programs for delivery in your classroom are being developed by McDougall Cottage Historic Site staff. When these programs are ready for launch information will be posted here.

For more information regarding upcoming McDougall Cottage Historic Site School Programs contact: 

 

Michelle Bartlet-Rozad
Historic Sites Coordinator
519-624-8250
Email Michelle Bartlet-Rozad

 Please fill out our quick and easy School Program Survey to help us improve our programs for your students.

General Information

Please discuss with your students as a minimum preparation:

  • a definition of the term museum.
  • the special consideration visitors to museums should show, for example, why not to touch objects unless asked to, and then how to handle them carefully.

Information to share with students and parents:

Appropriate Clothing
Please ensure that students are dressed for the weather and for a variety of outdoor activities. Portions of many of our programs may take place in the museum galleries or the heritage village. Most village buildings are heated but are often still quite cool early or late in the year.
Personal Protection
Doon Heritage Village is located on 60 acres of land, including environmentally sensitive forest and marsh land. We advise that on all outdoor school trips, you and your students take precautions against West Nile Virus. 
Washrooms
Washrooms are located at the museum entrance and in the village.
Lunch
Please inform us if you will be eating lunch at the site as a lunch room is available for students. No food is allowed in the galleries or the heritage village.
Admissions and Payment

Admission cost is $5.50 per student for 1/2 day programs and $10 per student for full day programs. One teacher/adult per six students is admitted free of charge. Additional adults are $5.50 per person for half day programs and $10 per person for full day programs.

Admissions should be paid upon arrival - VISA, MasterCard, Interac, cash or cheque - payable to the Waterloo Region Museum. Receipts will be issued. Schools can also be invoiced at the time of your visit.

Note student admission is higher for some educational programs such as the Groundwater Festival.

Please inquire about admission costs prior to making your booking.
Times
Program times may vary. Please discuss timing of your program at the time of booking. We strive to be as flexible as possible to accommodate bus schedules. 


At the End of Your Program/Day
Feel free to use the picnic areas for class activities or picnics but please do not re-enter the galleries or heritage village as you may interfere with other programs.

 

Visit Details

1. Upon arrival at the Ken Seiling Waterloo Region Museum, the class will be met by one of our staff and given a general introduction to the site and their program. At this time, the teacher will be directed to pay admission or arrange for invoicing. 

2. Following the introduction, each of the teacher/adult supervisors will be given a site guide and itinerary for their program. With most programs, there is not sufficient time to visit all buildings or exhibits at the museum.

3. Groups then leave the orientation area for the galleries or heritage village, escorted by one of our Guest Services Staff.

4. At each scheduled location, one of our historical interpreters will present the program and conduct student activities. Staff will also keep time for the program. Please stay on schedule where possible by going directly to your next program location. Do not visit locations other than those designated for your program as you may interfere with other programs in progress

5. Following your program, the groups may reassemble in the museum foyer prior to departure.

Teacher Resources
We recommend the following activities for the classroom before you visit Waterloo Region Museum with your students.
Classroom Suggestions for Once Upon a Time
 1. Have a dress-up day based on the pictures of children in 1914, provided on another page on this website.


2. If the weather allows, have children dress in costumes for their visit to Doon Heritage Village.

3. Learn songs popular in 1914. Examples are:

  • Bicycle Built For Two
  • I've Been Working On The Railroad
  • Take Me Out To The Ball Game
  • Row, Row, Row Your Boat
  • While Strolling Through The Park One Day
  • Let Me Call You Sweetheart
  • I Want A Girl, Just Like The Girl That Married Dear Old Dad
  • The Maple Leaf Forever

Other examples of strictly children's songs would be:

  • A Hunting We Will Go
  • Pop Goes The Weasel
  • The Farmer in the Dell (plus the game that goes with it)

4. Play some games from the turn of the century. Examples follow.

Animal, Vegetable, Mineral (also Beast, Bird or Fish)
Students sit in a circle. A ball is thrown by one player to any one of the others. The thrower calls out at the same time either mineral, animal or vegetable, and counts from one to ten rather quickly. If the player who is touched by the ball does not name something belonging to that kingdom called before the number ten is reached, the student leaves the game until the game restarts.

Minister's Cat
The first player begins by saying, "The Minister's cat is an ambitious cat", the next player "an artful cat" and so on until they have all named an adjective beginning with A. The next time of going around, the adjectives must begin with B and the next time C and so on until the whole of the alphabet has been used.

Grandmother's Trunk
This is one of the oldest word games on record. Each player has to repeat an ever-increasing list of objects. The first player starts by saying "My grandmother keeps an anchor in her trunk" (or any article beginning with A). The player on his left must think of an article beginning with B and say "My grandmother keeps an anchor and b... in her trunk." The game continues, with each player having to remember all the things kept in the trunk and each time trying to add one more thing according to the alphabet. Forgetting the list of things entails disqualification.

Feather
A small fluffy feather is required. All players sit in a circle as close together as possible. One throws up the feather as high as possible and then blows it up to keep it floating. The player to whom it then floats nearest does the same. The object of the game is to keep the feather aloft as long as possible. It cannot touch anyone or land on the floor.

5. Do some work with time lines so that students know how long ago Doon Heritage Village and the pioneer era are. Include some important dates such as:

  • the year the students were born
  • the year the teacher was born
  • the year(s) student's parents/grandparents were born

6. Do your own museum display of pioneer or 19th century items for the classroom. Use caution with students' family items.

7. If studying the turn of the century, collect some of the new products that were available in 1914 for a display.

Year Introduced

Product

1877

Quaker Oats

1879

Sunlight Soap

1885

French's Mustard

1890

Mackintosh's Toffee

1892

Maxwell House Coffee

1890

Fig Newtons

1893

Shredded Wheat

1893

Hires Root Beer

1897

Cadbury Milk Chocolate

1897

Jell-O

1897

Grape Nuts Cereal

1898

Pepsi Cola

1898

Graham Crackers

1904

Canada Dry Ginger Ale

1913

Quaker Puffed Rice

1913

Peppermint Life Saver



8. View silent movies from 1914 such as The Keystone Cops or something starring Charlie Chaplin. Be sure to preview these as they will take some explanation and some are not appropriate for younger children. Many are now available on video and are quite short.

Classroom Suggestions for Every Day Structures and Strong and Stable Structures
  1. If studying Structures and Stability, build a variety of models with the students, using concepts learned in the program. Use a variety of materials - Popsicle sticks, tinker toys, sticks and plasticine for chinking.
  2. Tour the school neighbourhood and note the types of modern homes: apartments, townhouses, detached, two storey, bungalows, etc. Have students draw diagrams and label the parts.
  3. Have students draw pictures of their own houses (or floor plans) and label the parts.
  4. Make arrangements for someone from the skilled trades to visit the classroom and explain what they do. Examples could include plumbers, electricians or drywallers.
Classroom Suggestions for A Village Christmas 1914
1. Your classroom study should focus on holiday and festive celebrations of all kinds and not just Christmas. Christmas is just one example, and in North America the most common example of a large cultural festival filled with elaborate traditions.


Many of your students may not celebrate Christmas but may celebrate other ethnic and religious festivals such as Hanukah, Ramadan, Kwanza, and many others. Have these students or their families/communities do presentations or talk about what their festivals are all about.

2. Investigate the history of various Christmas traditions in addition to the ones observed at Doon Heritage Village. The list of ethnic variations is endless. Each student will have their own family traditions to share and discuss. Present or have students research Christmas traditions from places such as Spain, Italy, Mexico, Ukraine or other countries.

3. Create a class song book of both Christmas songs and songs from other ethnic groups and festivals.

4. Create a class cookbook of favourite Christmas foods, as well as, ethnic and holiday foods from other festivals. Have students bring in examples of special holiday foods to share from their own background and festivals.

5. Decorate your classroom. Have one corner for Christmas and then several other areas with decorations or displays of holiday items from other ethnic groups and festivals. Create a very multicultural event.

6. Have a dress-up day based on the pictures of children in 1914.

7. If the weather allows, have children dress in costumes for their visit to Doon Heritage Village.

8. Learn Christmas songs popular in 1914. Examples include:

  • Silent Night
  • O Christmas Tree ( O Tannenbaum in German)
  • Away in a Manger
  • We Wish You a Merry Christmas
  • Jingle Bells

9. Play some games from the turn of the century. Examples follow:


Animal, Vegetable, Mineral (also Beast, Bird or Fish)
Players sit in a circle. A ball is thrown by one player to any one of the others. The thrower calls out at the same time either mineral, animal or vegetable, and counts from one to ten rather quickly. If the player who is touched by the ball does not name something belonging to that kingdom called before the number ten is reached, the student must leave the circle until the game restarts. Play continues until only one player remains.

Minister's Cat
The first player begins by saying, "The Ministers cat is an ambitious cat" the next player "an artful cat" and so on until they have all named an adjective beginning with A. The next time of going around, the adjectives must begin with B and the next time C and so on until the whole of the alphabet has been used.

Grandmother's Trunk
This is one of the oldest word games on record. Each player has to repeat an ever-increasing list of objects. The first player starts by saying "My grandmother keeps an anchor in her trunk" (or any article beginning with A). The player on his left must think of an article beginning with B and say "My grandmother keeps an anchor and b..... in her trunk". The game continues, with each player having to remember all the things kept in the trunk and each time trying to add one more thing according to the alphabet. Forgetting the list of things entails disqualification.

Feather
A small fluffy feather is required. All players sit in a circle as close together as possible. One throws up the feather as high as possible and then blows it up to keep it floating. The player to whom it then floats nearest does the same. The object of the game is to keep the feather aloft as long as possible. It can't touch anyone or land on the floor.

Classroom Suggestions for Amazing Machines
1. All machines, whether historical or modern, do the same things. They make work easier. They do this in three ways:
  • by increasing the force.
  • by increasing the speed.
  • by changing the direction of force


2. There are basically seven types of simple machines. They are:

  • the lever
  • the pulley
  • the wheel and axle
  • the inclined plane
  • the wedge
  • the screw
  • the gear


3. Complex machines are merely combinations of several simple machines. Have students make a list of, or bring in a large number of household tools. These may include scissors, pliers, various openers, a screwdriver, a chisel. a scraper. a knife, a door knob, nail clippers. Find examples in this list or collection of the seven simple machines.

4. Bring a more complex machine into the class room such as a bicycle or a mechanical clock. Have students see how many simple machines they can identify.

  • Friction - The force that makes two surfaces stick when they are rubbed against each other.
  • Work - What happens when a force moves through a distance.
  • Machine - A device used to make work easier
  • Pulley - A wheel that turns on an axle and has a rope over its rim to pull on in order to lift a load.
  • Lever - A bar for raising or moving a load at one end by pushing down on the other end.
  • Fulcrum - The turning point, or pivot point , of a lever.
  • First Class Lever - A lever with the fulcrum between the effort and the resistance.
  • Second Class Lever - A lever with the resistance between the effort and the fulcrum.
  • Third Class Lever - A lever with the effort between the fulcrum and the resistance.
  • Effort - The force exerted by a machine when it is used.
  • Resistance - The force that a machine works against when it is used.
  • Wedge - A simple machine with two straight sides that come to a point.
  • Inclined Plane - A ramp or sloping surface.
  • Wheel and Axle - A wheel fixed to an axle, like the steering wheel of a car.
  • Fixed Pulley - A pulley whose axle stays in one place when it is used.
  • Movable Pulley - A pulley that moves up or down when it is used.
  • Block and Tackle - A combination of two fixed pulleys and two movable pulleys, used to increase the advantage of force by four times.
  • Thread - The winding, sloping ridge of a bolt or screw.
  • Gear - A wheel with teeth that imparts or transmits motion by acting on another wheel or chain. For our program there are five types - spur, crown, bevel, rack and worm.


Historical Information

Discuss time lines so that students know how long ago Doon Heritage Village and the pioneer era are. Include some important dates such as:

  • the year the students were born
  • the year the teacher was born
  • the year(s) students parents/grandparents were born
Waterloo Region County Timeline
Waterloo County Time Line

For more information or to book a Ken Seiling Waterloo Region Museum School Program contact: 

Michael Van Huisseling
Education Coordinator 
519-748-1914 ext. 3269
Email Michael Van Huisseling